Huong Ngo

By Huong Ngo

LifeBuzz Staff

Mysterious 500-Year-Old Carving Finally Gave Up Its Secrets After An X-Ray.

Art has existed all throughout history. For example, these miniature boxwood carvings, are from the 16th century and they're elegantly beautiful. The 500-year-old carvings are the size of a palm and feature religious iconography.

Although researchers in the field aren't entirely sure, they believe these works of art were made somewhere between 1500 and 1530 in the Netherlands or Flanders. They have long been a mystery to specialists but recent analysis has brought new insight to light.

These miniature boxwood carvings come in tiny altarpieces, rosaries, and prayer beads. They're each created from a single boxwood fragment.

These miniature boxwood carvings come in tiny altarpieces, rosaries, and prayer beads. They're each created from a single boxwood fragment.

Craig Boyko

The pieces incorporate pins that are smaller than a grass seed, which hold the pieces together.

The pieces incorporate pins that are smaller than a grass seed, which hold the pieces together.

Ian Lefebvre

Curators and conservators of exhibition "Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures" at The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rijksmuseum have been using micro CT scanning and Advanced 3D Analysis Software that has brought new insight into the art pieces and subject matter of each boxwood.

Curators and conservators of exhibition "Small Wonders: Gothic Boxwood Miniatures" at The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in collaboration with the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Rijksmuseum have been using micro CT scanning and Advanced 3D Analysis Software that has brought new insight into the art pieces and subject matter of each boxwood.

Craig Boyko

The "Small Wonders" exhibition will displace AGO's collection in addition to 50 other loaned pieces that other museums and private collections have provided.

The "Small Wonders" exhibition will displace AGO's collection in addition to 50 other loaned pieces that other museums and private collections have provided.

Ian Lefebvre

Such pieces include some rare carvings that have never been seen in North America. One of the art pieces, an eleven-bead Chatsworth Rosary, belonged to King Henry VIII and his wife Catherine Aragon.

Such pieces include some rare carvings that have never been seen in North America. One of the art pieces, an eleven-bead Chatsworth Rosary, belonged to King Henry VIII and his wife Catherine Aragon.

Craig Boyko

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